The Daily Nightly from NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams

About this blog

The Daily Nightly began on May 31, 2005. As Brian wrote in his first post it aims to provide a narrative of the broadcast day and a window into the editorial process at NBC Nightly News. Brian weighs in every weekday and NBC News correspondents and producers post regularly.

Brian Williams became the seventh anchor and managing editor in the history of NBC Nightly News on December 2, 2004. Read his full biography.

Medal of honor: Wesley L. Fox

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

WESLEY L. FOX
First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps  Company A, 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Fox_96 Eighteen-year-old Wesley Fox thought he was enlisting in the Marines for four years in 1950, but he wound up staying for forty-three. Rising through the enlisted and officer ranks to become a colonel, he claims that he never would have left the Corps had it not been for mandatory retirement.
Fox spent the Korean War lugging a Browning Automatic Rifle from one battle to another and was wounded in action in 1951. For the next fifteen years, he continued to rise through the ranks. He was a first lieutenant in 1967 when he went to Vietnam as an adviser to the South Vietnamese Marines; he stayed with them through the Tet Offensive of 1968. He liked the indigenous troops but felt that their idea of warfare tended to be “search-and-avoid,” so he signed on for another tour of duty in Vietnam with the Ninth Marines in hopes of “getting something done.”

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Medal of honor: Robert F. Foley

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

ROBERT F. FOLEY
Captain, U.S. Army  Company A, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division
Foley_93 Robert Foley was a basketball star in high school. At six foot seven, he had received fifteen college scholarship offers by the end of his senior year. He was still considering his options when the hockey
coach from West Point happened to pass through Massachusetts on a weekend Foley scored forty-four points in a game. He told the West Point basketball coach about Foley. The coach invited him for a visit and asked him to play Army basketball. Foley knew that going to West Point would eliminate the possibility of his playing professional basketball, but he was impressed with the history and sense of purpose he saw at the academy and decided to enroll.

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Medal of Honor: James P. Fleming

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

JAMES P. FLEMING
First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force 20th Special Operations Squadron
Fleming_89 James Fleming never had any doubt that he would follow in the footsteps of his father, a career Air Force pilot. After graduating from Washington State University, he was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Air Force. Following flight school, he became a UH-1F (Huey) helicopter pilot with the Air Force 20th Special Operations Squadron. In 1968, he was living in the jungle of Vietnam and flying Special Forces teams on long-range reconnaissance patrols deep into enemy territory. On November 26, his five-ship Green Hornet flight—two Huey gunships and three lightly armed Huey slicks—heard over the radio that one of the Special Forces patrols it had inserted earlier was being overrun by a large group of North Vietnamese. The Green Hornets went to get them.

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Medal of honor: Michael J. Fitzmaurice

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

MICHAEL J. FITZMAURICE
Specialist fourth Class, U.S. Army  Troop D, 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division
Fitzmaurice_86 In the spring of 1971, the 2nd Squadron of the 17th Cavalry was guarding the airstrip at Khe Sanh
in South Vietnam for American planes flying missions into Laos. At about 2:00 a.m. on March 23, Michael Fitzmaurice—at twenty-one one of the older men in his unit—had just returned from guard duty to his bunker living quarters. The North Vietnamese had been intermittently mortaring American positions during the day, but the night seemed calm. Suddenly, the shells started coming in again.

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Medal of Honor: Bernard F. Fisher

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

BERNARD F. FISHER
Major, U.S. Air Force  1st Air Commandos
Fisher_85 After serving briefly in the Navy at the end of World War II, Bernard Fisher spent 1947 to 1950 in the Air National Guard, then joined ROTC while he was a college student in Utah. Commissioned a second lieutenant in the Air Force in 1951, he served as a jet fighter pilot in the Air Defense Command until 1965, when he volunteered to serve in Vietnam.

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Medal of honor: John W. Finn

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

JOHN W. FINN
Aviation Ordnance Chief, U.S. Navy
Finn_82John Finn dropped out of school after the seventh grade and worked at various jobs until a few days before his seventeenth birthday, when he joined the Navy. It was 1926, and the world seemed permanently at peace, without even a rumor of war. What Finn wanted was to travel. Over the next few years, he got his wish, serving on a variety of ships that took him up through the Panama Canal and six hundred miles up the Yangtze River.

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Medal of Honor: In memoriam

Editor's Note: Today we are sad to announce the passing of one of the 110 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, U.S. Navy Commanding Officer Eugene B. Fluckey. Mr. Fluckey was to be honored in this space on Friday, July 6. He passed away on Thursday, June 28. He lived in Annapolis, Md., and is survived by his wife Margaret and family.  Here, we pay special recognition to Mr. Stuckey and his service to the United States.
MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

EUGENE B. FLUCKEY
Commander, U.S. Navy  Commanding Officer, USS Barb
Fluckey_90 As one of the most successful U.S. submarine commanders in World War II, Eugene Fluckey would
be called “Lucky” to rhyme with his last name. But his naval career hardly began with good fortune: On the day he graduated from the Naval Academy in 1935, his parents were involved in a car crash on their way to the ceremonies. His mother was killed and his father was left an invalid.

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MEDAL OF HONOR: FREDERICK E. FERGUSON

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

FREDERICK E. FERGUSON
Chief Warrant Officer, U.S. Army  Company C, 227th Aviation Battalion,
1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)

Ferguson_81_2 Frederick Ferguson got a part-time job driving a gas truck to pay for flying lessons while serving out his enlistment in the Navy, earning his pilot’s license before his discharge in 1962. Over the next two years, he hung out at airports and got his commercial license. Then he took his first helicopter ride and knew instantly that he wanted to be a helicopter pilot. He joined the Army’s Warrant Officer program and graduated from the nine-month program in May 1967 certified in rotary-winged aircraft. Two weeks later, he was in Vietnam, a copilot with the 227th Aviation Battalion of the 1st Cavalry (Airmobile). By August he was in command of his own helicopter, a UH-1D slick.

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Medal of Honor: Walter D. Ehlers

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

WALTER D. EHLERS
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army  18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division

Ehlers_77 Walter Ehlers’s older brother, Roland, had bullied and protected him throughout their childhood in Kansas. By D-Day, the two had already fought their way through North Africa and Sicily in the same unit. While training for the Normandy landing, Walter was made a squad leader and transferred to a different company. The brothers wished each other luck and promised to “meet up on the beach.”
The first wave was pinned down on the beach. Ehlers’s squad, along with about two hundred other soldiers, were on an LCI (landing craft, infantry) scheduled to be in the second wave. Orders were quickly changed. Ehlers and his squad were transferred to a Higgins boat and sent to the beach three hours ahead of the second wave. They were not prepared for the chaos that they found on the beach.

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Medal of Honor: Russell E. Dunham

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

RUSSELL E. DUNHAM
Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army  Company I, 30th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division

Dunham_75 In mid-1940, Russell Dunham, unable to find a job, joined the Army. After the war started, he saw action in North Africa, Sicily, and Anzio as part of the 3rd Infantry Division. In August 1944, his unit landed at Toulon in the south of France and fought its way toward Alsace-Lorraine. Five months later, Sergeant Dunham’s company was facing a significant German force at the small town of Kaysersberg, France.
On the morning of Jan. 8, 1945, the men were issued white mattress covers to camouflage them in
the deep snow and ordered on patrol. Heavily armed with carbine magazines and a dozen grenades hooked into his belt, Dunham scrambled through the snow up a hill where three German machine guns were dug in.

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