The Daily Nightly from NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams

About this blog

The Daily Nightly began on May 31, 2005. As Brian wrote in his first post it aims to provide a narrative of the broadcast day and a window into the editorial process at NBC Nightly News. Brian weighs in every weekday and NBC News correspondents and producers post regularly.

Brian Williams became the seventh anchor and managing editor in the history of NBC Nightly News on December 2, 2004. Read his full biography.

Things are Heating Up...

Good afternoon.

Coming up tonight on NBC Nightly news, we'll have coverage of the continuing heat wave in the west. The video we've seen from bank thermometers looks like they're displaying NBA scores.  Lots of triple digits, and not a drop of rain to cool things down. As these things go the risk of heat-related deaths and wildfires increases each day. NBC's Charles Hadlock is on the top of that for us today.

Jim Maceda will explore a new twist to the violence in Iraq, where 8 American soldiers have died over the last few days, and over 100 civilians were killed today in a car bombing north of Iraq.  There is good news in that the troop surge is working to stem the violence in Baghdad, but the bad news is, insurgents are stepping-up their attacks outside the capital as demonstrated by today's attack in Tuz Khormato.

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Making a Difference in prison

I've only been in a prison a handful of times and in the past, it has always made me nervous.  This visit was no different at first. However, it was obvious within minutes that these inmates were different.  Our NBC team of correspondent Don Teague, camera man Mike Heimbuch, and sound technician Dana Marxen spent an afternoon profiling a new prison program in Texas.  The inmates were intelligent,
respectful, and hungry for someone to care about their desire to be better citizens when they got out.   

Tonight's "Making a Difference" segment features a woman who left what some people call the good life: a job on Wall Street and making six figures before she was even 30 years old.  But for Catherine Rohr,
something was missing.  Catherine went on an overseas mission trip and when she returned felt empty doing the daily million-dollar deals.  She knew she needed to make a career change, but would've never guessed she'd end up in of all places ... a Texas prison. 

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End-of-the-week roundup

Good afternoon, I hope you are having a good Friday.

On Nightly News tonight we'll be reporting on an American connection to at least two of the suspects in the Glasgow terror bombing attempt. We now know the suspects made inquiries within the last year to a group that helps foreign physicians come to the United States to practice medicine.  Our senior investigative correspondent Lisa Meyers will have that, plus new video of one of the suspects being wrestled away from the burning car in the immediate aftermath of the Scotland attack.

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Medal of Honor: James P. Fleming

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

JAMES P. FLEMING
First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force 20th Special Operations Squadron
Fleming_89 James Fleming never had any doubt that he would follow in the footsteps of his father, a career Air Force pilot. After graduating from Washington State University, he was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Air Force. Following flight school, he became a UH-1F (Huey) helicopter pilot with the Air Force 20th Special Operations Squadron. In 1968, he was living in the jungle of Vietnam and flying Special Forces teams on long-range reconnaissance patrols deep into enemy territory. On November 26, his five-ship Green Hornet flight—two Huey gunships and three lightly armed Huey slicks—heard over the radio that one of the Special Forces patrols it had inserted earlier was being overrun by a large group of North Vietnamese. The Green Hornets went to get them.

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Early Nightly is up

Earlynightly

NBC's Anne Thompson previews some of the stories we're working on for tonight's broadcast, which will be anchored by Lester Holt.

Click here or on the image to watch.

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FALLEN BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

Editor's note: Washington Producer John Rutherford posts a weekly blog on burials of service members at Arlington National Cemetery. Since there were no public burials this past week, we are posting the burial of a highly decorated Green Beret on May 31, right after Memorial Day. 

Conner Headstone by headstone, row by row, Section 60 at Arlington National Cemetery is slowly filling with the casualties from Iraq.

Umbrell, Colby. Pursel, Michael. Murphy, Christopher. On May 31 it was Conner, Bradly. Number 341.

Sgt. Maj. Bradly Conner, 41, a highly decorated Green Beret on this fourth tour in Iraq, was killed May 9 by a roadside bomb. As an Army band played "America the Beautiful" in the distance, he was buried at Arlington Cemetery.

Conner's widow, Cynthia, and their three children, Aaron, 14, Katie, 12, and Rachel, 6, were among the many tearful mourners.

Photo courtesy USASOC News Service



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One very courageous marine

NBC News Pentagon Producer Courtney Kube recently wrote about a Marine she met who has seen more than his fair share of death and trauma in Iraq, but he's alive to talk about it. Read her entry, "One Very Courageous Marine" in our sister blog allDAY.

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Lots to talk about ...

Good afternoon. Brian is enjoying the rest of the week off, and I'll be in the anchor chair this evening.

Tonight on Nightly News we are going to drill down beyond the latest airline flight delay statistics. By themselves they are bad -- the worst in 13 years. But those numbers only tell part of the story. The Department of Transportation only tracks the on-time performance for flights, not for passengers. A flight delayed two-hours is bad enough, but if as a result you miss your connecting flight, your actual delay can be several hours if not a couple of days. Our aviation correspondent Tom Costello is going to try and put it all in perspective, and help us understand what we're all really up against this summer when we head to the airport.

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Early Nightly is up

Earlynightly

Brian is on vacation and Lester Holt will be anchoring tonight's broadcast, but NBC's Tom Costello takes over vlog duty today, previewing some of the stories we're working on for tonight's broadcast.

Click here or on the image to watch.

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Medal of honor: Michael J. Fitzmaurice

MohbookEvery weekday for 110 straight days we will feature a different living recipient of the Medal of Honor. These are the men who have received their nation's highest military honor. Brian is a board member of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. The words and photos are courtesy of Artisan Books, publishers of "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty by Peter Collier with photographs by Nick Del Calzo.

MICHAEL J. FITZMAURICE
Specialist fourth Class, U.S. Army  Troop D, 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division
Fitzmaurice_86 In the spring of 1971, the 2nd Squadron of the 17th Cavalry was guarding the airstrip at Khe Sanh
in South Vietnam for American planes flying missions into Laos. At about 2:00 a.m. on March 23, Michael Fitzmaurice—at twenty-one one of the older men in his unit—had just returned from guard duty to his bunker living quarters. The North Vietnamese had been intermittently mortaring American positions during the day, but the night seemed calm. Suddenly, the shells started coming in again.

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